Netflix Hot Girls Wanted

Is there more to the Netflix story than meets the eye? Let’s look at the PROOF

Today I’m going to be the bad guy. I’m going to go against the grain and say what needs to be said, even if it’s not popular.  There is a thing called reasonable expectation of privacy. It’s a legal concept that covers where a person can reasonably expect privacy.

For example, in the most simplistic terms, when one turns on the popular cartoon SpongeBob Square Pants, one might reasonably expect to find SpongeBob in a pair of Square Pants because he’s been in square pants in every other episode.

Playboy Playmate (May 2014) Dani Mathers was nailed because she took a picture of a lady in the gym locker room. This is a place where a person can reasonably expect privacy. Your average person would assume that while they are in the gym locker room, nobody would pull out a camera, take a picture and broadcast that naked picture on social media.

The 29-year-old Mathers faced widespread criticism after she shared the photo on Snapchat in July 2016 with the caption: “If I can’t unsee this then you can’t either.” She later apologized and deleted her social media accounts.

Last year she said she “very much regrets” what happened. But an apology isn’t enough for the courts. She now faces up to 6 months in jail and a fine of up to $1,000.

You can’t just go around taking pictures of people because you don’t like them, or you don’t like the way they look and you can’t post those pictures and make fun of that person. There are laws against these things.

And while these laws have existed for many years, the courts have only recently started to crack down on violators who post these photos on social media or their blogs.

Recently this expectation of privacy issue came about in regards to the Netflix series, Hot Girls Wanted: Turned On.

Gia Paige said she was horrified to find out that they broadcast her real name and showed her real facebook page.

Others were quick to join Gia Paige in her crusade. But again, I’m going to have to be the bad guy here and say, how can one have a reasonable expectation that they wouldn’t post their real name when they did it before?

Hot Girls Wanted: Turned On is part two, a continuation of the original documentary. In the original, they released the real name and hometown of every single girl.

So knowing that they did this before, not once, not only twice, not only three times but with every single girl profiled – why would a reasonable person not assume they would do it again?

You can’t claim you didn’t know they would use your real name when in fact, every single time before they used real names. In fact, it would be unreasonable to assume they wouldn’t. I mean if they released the real name, age, and hometown of every single other girl, why wouldn’t they do the same to you?

But more than that, can Gia Paige the performer truly expect privacy when her on again off again fiance Riley Reynolds of Hussie Models posts things from her “private” (real name) Facebook page, on his own social media accounts.

How can you expect and demand privacy from Netflix when you are exposed by your own fiance time and time again?

You’ll notice we took the time to block out Gia Paige’s real name. She and her own fiance don’t bother to do this on twitter and facebook. It’s happened numerous times since they’ve been together. The above examples are only two of the probably 10 or 20 times I found without much effort. You can’t expect fans or stalkers not to figure out your real name when you out yourself! #DUH

So this, in a nutshell, is why Gia Paige can’t sue Netflix and expect to win.

Which then begs the question, knowing this, why is she fighting so hard, being so public about all of this?

Is it possibly just a grab for attention? This is the most publicity she has ever gotten. Could that be the REAL reason she is doing this?

That’s the real question.

 

One Reply to “Is there more to the Netflix story than meets the eye? Let’s look at the PROOF”

  1. lukas411

    It was obvious from the getgo that gia was crying fowl just to get extra publicity. So called that one.